Henriëtte Ronner-Knip (1821-1909, Dutch)

Henriëtte Ronner-Knip-(1821-1909)

Henriëtte Ronner-Knip(1821-1909)

Henriëtte Ronner – Knip was born in Amsterdam into a family of painters. Quite precocious, she sold her first painting at age 15. Highly decorated with a myriad of medals and honors, and having painted for many of the royalty in Europe, Ronner-Knip is well known for her paintings of domestic pets, primarily cats. Paintings of pets were popular with the wealthy bourgeois in the Victorian era, and her many paintings of cats getting into mischief in domestic scenes proved to be favorites. Mostly sentimental portrayals, her paintings rarely offer any metaphorical meanings, and are focused only on the cats themselves. She studied her cat subjects with avidity and sincerity even going so far as to construct a specially built glass-fronted studio wherein her cats could freely scamper about, sleep, and get into the type of trouble that only cats can as the prolific Ronner-Knip sketched and painted.

Below find more than 100 of her paintings.   

 

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Want to know more about the cat in art, history and literature? Then this is the book for you. Available on Amazon.

 

 

Revered and Reviled: A Complete History of the Domestic Cat, cat history, cats

 

 

 

 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2013-2016 Laura Vocelle

Comments

  1. Barbara Pennell says

    I have the painting, ‘Up to No Good” by Henriette Ronner-Knip. There is a label on back stating the name of the painting and artist, and it also says, Oil on Canvas Courtesy Private Collection, Fine Art Images, Inc. NY. I don’t see that it is signed. Do you know about this company and if they sell reproductions, or just what this may be? Thanks.

    • The company Film Imaging is located in NYC and just as its name states deals in copies. I don’t believe you have an original painting, but you can always take it to an antique dealer to make sure. Good luck.

  2. Jan Querdibitty says

    I also have a cat picture signed by Foujita 1926. Any idea of the value for this? Thnx.

    • A good place to check is on the Christies.com website or any other auction site. I believe the Ronner-Knip paintings can be worth quite a lot. Past auctions on Christie’s show paintings selling for 40,000 Euros and more.

  3. Jan Querdibitty says

    Hello. I have a cat picture signed by Henriette Ronner. Label on the back says “The Parson Kitten”. Any idea if this is valuable or not. Thanks. Jan

  4. Melinda White says

    I’m looking for a print that I think a friend’s mother may have used as the model for a sketch she did. There are three fuzzy, Persian kittens standing on some papers with a cigar in the foreground and an urn or casserole dish of some sort in the left background. She had to be copying Ronner-Knipp but I can’t find an image anywhere. Any ideas? I’ve found lots of images with three kittens and a cigar, but they have too many other items in them

  5. I have a painting by henrietta ronner-knip called ‘a pretty kitten’. It’s in an old frame and the frame has a small metal plaque titled ‘A PRETTY KITTEN Henrietta Ronner-Knip 1821-1909.
    Can I have your opinion and comments

    • LA Vocelle says

      WOW! If I were you, I would take it to an art dealer/auctioneer and find out what it’s worth. If an original, it could be worth a lot.

  6. Jennie Wallace says

    Hello,
    I would like to know if my purchase of “Kittens and New Hat” by Henriette Ronner-Knip picture painting is worth anything? I only paid $4.00 for it at the Goodwill store. Thank you!

    • Is your painting an original or a print? If an original, I suggest you contact an auction site or house to find out what it’s worth.

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