Jean-Baptiste Oudry (1686-1755, French)

Jean-Baptiste Oudry, etching made by his wife, Marie-Marguerite Froissé, cats in art cat paintings

Jean-Baptiste Oudry, etching made by his wife, Marie-Marguerite Froissé

Jean-Baptiste Oudry (1686-1755, French) was a French Rococo/Baroque genre painter, illustrator and creator of tapestries.  Along with Alexandre-Francoise Deportés (1661-1743), he was the foremost painter of animals and still lifes of the period with domestic cats playing an important part in many of his works. The son of a painter and art dealer he soon followed in the footsteps of his father.   In 1719, he was accepted into the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture.  In the 1720’s, he created a series of tapestries called The Pastoral Amusements.  By 1727, Oudry was producing hunting scenes and his painting Louis XV hunting a deer in the Forest of Saint-Germain (1730) secured his reputation with the King who went on to commission many of his works. Subsequently, as a result of his works becoming quite sought after, he became quite wealthy. After suffering a series of strokes, Oudry died and was buried in the Church of Saint-Thomas in Beauvais. His epitaph on the stone was lost when the church was demolished in 1795, but was later found and placed in the Church of Saint-Étienne.

 

 

Jean-Baptiste Oudry two cats 1725

Two Cats
1725

 

Jean Baptiste Oudry, Le Serail du Doguin, 1734 cat paintings

 

Still life with cat and game cat art, cat paintings, jean baptiste oudry

 

Jean Baptiste Oudry The Cat and the Monkey 1739 Brimingham Museum and Art Gallery

The Cat and the Monkey
1739
Brimingham Museum and Art Gallery

 

Jean Baptiste Oudry, Head of a Cat Meowing

Head of a Cat Meowing

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